Tuesday, September 7, 2021

John Travolta Eats Pizza

 



JOHN TRAVOLTA - PIZZA

"Saturday Night Fever"

by Bellino 






TRAVOLTA EATS PIZZA

by BELLINO










SUNDAY SAUCE 

WHEN ITALIAN-AMERICANS COOK

TRAVOLTA PASTA

And More ...







JOHN TRAVOLTA








JOHN TRAVOLTA 







JOHN'S PIZZA of BLEECKER STREET

NEW YORK




















Johns Pizza & American Flag

 





JOHN'S PIZZA

With AMERICAN FLAG

GREENWICH VILLAGE, NEW YORK







JOHN'S PIZZERIA

And AMERICAN FLAG







CONEY ILSAND WONDER WHEEL

BROOKLYN, NEW YORK







JOHN'S PIZZA

Of BLEECKER STREET









Tuesday, August 17, 2021

PIZZA GOD

 





The "PIZZA GOD" ???

Dom DeMarco

DiFARA PIZZERIA

BROOKLYN, NEW YORK









"The PIZZA GOD" ? Dom DeMarco of DiFara Pizzeria New York is considered one of the Greatest Pizzaioli in The World, if Not Thee Greatest of All. We think he is, and his Pizza is The Best you can Get anywhere in The World, including Naples Italy, "we think Dom's Pizza is Better," and many would agree. Get this one-of-a-kind Limited Edition Tee Shirt of the Greatest Pizza Maker alive, the one we call "Pizza God" Dom DeMarco, Brooklyn, New York.

GIFT IDEAS : Christmas, Birthdays and all occasions.










SUNDAY SAUCE

WHEN ITALIAN AMERICANS COOK







JOHN'S PIZZA with AMERICAN FLAG

by Bellino









JOHN'S of BLEECKER STREET PIZZA









My Favorite Pizza in Rome

 




La PIZZAIOLI

PIZZERIA MARMI

TRASTEVERE, ROMA

ITALY



Really good pizza at busy spot on Viale Trastevere. This place has a large outdoor restaurant that fills up quickly. It is popular with locals and tourists alike. The pizza was very good as were the fried starters.

This restaurant is such fun to be in. Excellent pizza and Roman specialties. Quick service and a buzzing dining room. We especially enjoyed watching the guys throw twenty pizzas in the oven all at once!






PIZZERIA MARMI

ROME





My 1st PIZZA at PIZZERIA MARMI

Quattro Stagioni

Fou Seasons Pizza

June 1986

My 2nd Trip to Rome




Le MENU

PIZZERIA MARMI

Most PIZZE is around 6 EUROS







PASTA e FAGIOLI

AT Pizzeria Marmi






Pizzeria Ai Marmi

Viale Trastevere 53,
Rome, Italy (Trastevere)





ITALIAN FOOD MEMORIES









MAKE at HOME










Monday, August 9, 2021

Port Alba Pizza Recipe Naples Italy

 



PORT'ALBA ANTICA PIZZERIA

NAPOLI









A Pretty Pizzaiola





PIZZA MARGHERITA

NAPOLI







NAPLES - POSITANO

The AMALFI COAST

COOKBOOK / TRAVEL


And More ...











Tuesday, July 20, 2021

Iconic New York Pizza "The Worlds Best" ?

 



JOHN'S PIZZERIA

aka JOHN'S of BLEECKER STREET

My FAVORITE PIZZERIA OVERALL





TOTONNO'S PIZZERIA NAPOLITANO

NEPTUNE AVENUE

CONEY ISLAND, BROOKLYN

NEW YORK

"LOVE IT"





Pizzaiolo Michael

TOTONNO'S

Coney Island





The MASTER

Dom DeMarco

DiFARA PIZZA

Avenue "J"

BROOKLYN, NY





The Great Mark Iacono

At LUCALI'S

Carroll Gardens, Brooklyn





The OVEN at LOMBARDI'S

"This is where it all Started"

AMERICA'S 1st PIZZERIA

Opened in 1905 by Genaro Lombardi




Genaro Lombardi with pizzaiolo Totonno Pero

1905

SPRING STREET

NEW YORK NY




Inside LOMBARDI'S








JOE'S PIZZA

Carmine Street

New York NY

NEW YORK'S BEST LOVED SLICE







The Soho Square

From PRINCE STREET PIZZA

Now my FAVORITE PIECE of PIZZA in New York

But when it comes to a so-called Plain Slice ?

Nobody Beats Dom DeMarco and his awesomely tasty PIZZA
at DiFARA PIZZA Brooklyn, New York, and the World's Single Best PIZZA

"SERIOUSLY" !!!





The GREAT DOM DeMARCO

ANd The WORLD'S BEST PIZZA ?

"DOM'S"

DiFARA PIZZERIA

BROOKLYN, NEW YORK







PATSY'S PIZZERIA

East Harlem , New York


"FRANK SINATRA'S FAVORITE"






SUNDAY SAUCE

alla BELLINO alla PACINO







JOHN'S PIZZA













SAL & CARMINE'S PIZZA

Since 1957

Upper West Side of Manhattan

2671 BROADWAY, NY NY

As The Signs says, "CRISPY PIZZA" !!!

One of NEW YORK'S BEST






FAMOUS BEN'S PIZZA

SPRING STREET

Soho





SFINCIONE

"REAL SICILIAN PIZZA" !!!

BEN'S is one of The Few Places in NEW YORK 
to Get REAL AUTHENTIC SICILIAN PIZZA, "SFINCIONE"

aka PIZZA PALERMITANA

Of PALERMO






RECIPES From MY SICILIAN NONNA
























Thursday, July 1, 2021

How to Make Focaccia at home - Recipe

 

 



A Fresh Baked FOCACCIA 





FOCACCIA RECIPE

3 ¾ cups all-purpose flour
1 tablespoon kosher salt
1 teaspoon  active dry yeast
1 ¾ cups  warm water


MAKING The DOUGH

Step 1: In a large bowl, thoroughly combine the flour, salt, and yeast. Pour in the warm water (about 110 degrees) and use your hands to mix and fold the dough until all the flour is incorporated. The dough will be sticky.

Step 2: Transfer the dough to a plastic container and store covered in the fridge for at least 8 hours and up to two days.


COOKING the FOCACCIA

Step 1: When you are ready to make your pizza, remove the dough from the refrigerator. Temper it for about an hour at room temperature.

Step 2: Use the olive oil to generously coat an 18-by-13-inch baking sheet. Transfer the focaccia dough to the pan and fold it over on itself. Let the dough rise in a warm place for 1½ to 2 hours, or until doubled in size. (Your rising time will vary depending on climate and humidity.)

Step 3: Preheat the oven to 450 degrees and turn on the convection fan if you have one. If you have a baking stone or baking peel, place it in the center of the oven rack.

Step 4: Coat your palms using the olive oil that pools in the sides of the pan, and gently press, stretching and flattening the dough to the edges. Use your fingertips to gently dimple the dough. Sprinkle the flaky sea salt and ½ teaspoon Aleppo pepper across it, then top with the green garlic and zucchini slices, and finish by sprinkling the remaining ½ teaspoon Aleppo pepper.

Step 5: Bake for 15 to 18 minutes or until the crust is golden-brown.

Step 6: Using a large metal spatula, transfer the focaccia pizza from the baking sheet to a cooling rack. Top with grated Parmesan cheese, lemon zest, and ricotta salata.





FAVORITE ITALIAN FOODS

And SECRET RECIPES





Saturday, June 19, 2021

New York Pizza Slice Joints NYC

 



NEW YORK PIZZA

SLICE JOINTS


Pizza can be a great divider in New York. In fact, one of the easiest ways to get into argument (without end) is to name a “Best Pizza in the City.” But at the same time, pizza — specifically the reheated, foldable, portable slice — is one of the city’s great uniters. There is no culinary experience that New Yorkers share more widely and more unanimously than the slice joint. Like catching a sunset over the skyline or stepping in an icy curbside puddle, the slice joint has, since its beginnings more than 50 years ago, become common currency.  

 New York pizza starts with large waves of Italian immigrants settling in the city in the late 19th and early 20th centuries. By 1920, roughly a quarter of the 1.6 million Italian immigrants in the United States were living in New York, establishing enclaves in Manhattan, Brooklyn and the Bronx. Such neighborhoods were home to the first pizzerias, like Lombardi’s in Little Italy, which opened on Spring Street in 1905. The namesake of the Neapolitan immigrant Gennaro Lombardi, the restaurant used a coal-fired oven to create pizzas with puffy, charred crusts and a bubbling layer of tomato sauce and cheese that made it one of the most popular restaurants in Little Italy. As if in biblical succession, as apprentices left to start their own pizza operations, Lombardi’s begat Totonno’s in Coney Island, John’s in Greenwich Village and Patsy’s in what is now Spanish HarlemThese are the four acknowledged prewar pizza pillars in the city. (Though none of them was a slice joint in the current sense.)

The price has changed over the decades, but the scene and staging remain much the same. Look at the crowd of New Yorkers and tourists alike bundled in winter coats on a recent Wednesday night at Joe’s Pizza on Carmine Street. The pies at Joes, which opened in 1975, are considered among the city’s best. See how the customers rotate in a perfect line through the door and up to the glass case, their orders ready and their money in hand. “Three dollars,” the pizza man says briskly, after he has placed the requested slice into a decked oven. Out come the hot, bubbling triangles of cheese and sauce on thin, pliable crust. Once their slices are ready, the diners — if so formal a word even applies — grab a place at the counter in the window or push out the door, slice in hand, on to wherever the evening may take them. This is the “New York style.” 

The origin story of New York pizza starts with large waves of Italian immigrants settling in the city in the late 19th and early 20th centuries. By 1920, roughly a quarter of the 1.6 million Italian immigrants in the United States were living in New York, establishing enclaves in Manhattan, Brooklyn and the Bronx. Such neighborhoods were home to the first pizzerias, like Lombardi’s in Little Italy, which opened on Spring Street in 1905. The namesake of the Neapolitan immigrant Gennaro Lombardi, the restaurant used a coal-fired oven to create pizzas with puffy, charred crusts and a bubbling layer of tomato sauce and cheese that made it one of the most popular restaurants in Little Italy. As if in biblical succession, as apprentices left to start their own pizza operations, Lombardi’s begat Totonno’s in Coney Island, John’s in Greenwich Village and Patsy’s in what is now Spanish HarlemThese are the four acknowledged prewar pizza pillars in the city

Hot, filling and eaten with the hands, pizza elicited breathless coverage from The Times fairly early on, as food writers marveled at the appealing combination of ingredients and convenience. By 1947, the paper was fully sold. “A round of dough is baked with tomatoes and anchovies and cheese atop, cut into wedges, then eaten with the fingers between gulps of wine,” the food editor Jane Nickerson enthused. “The pizza could be as popular a snack as the hamburger if Americans only knew more about it.” 

Nine years later, The Times’s Herbert Mitgang contemplated the reasons for pizza’s popularity, writing, “The guess is that a number of Americans of Italian origin, aided by advertising and refrigeration, have made pizza as delectable as such other postwar imports as Lollobrigida” — referring to Gina, the saucy Roman film star. The Neapolitan-style pie became a chic dinner-party staple that could also be supplemented with a salad for a filling, family meal. But one innovation would change how New Yorkers enjoyed pizza forever. 





RAY'S PIZZA

6th Avenue, GREENWICH VILLAGE, NEW YORK

1984


Frank Mastro, an Italian immigrant and businessman, saw the potential for pizza to be as popular in America as the hot dog. He just had to figure out a way to make it quicker and cheaper for both restaurant owners and diners. So in the mid-1930s, he devised a gas pizza oven that maintained optimal temperatures even as the door was opened over and over. 

Although it is hard to pinpoint when pizza was first sold by the slice, the introduction of the gas oven with multiple decks gave New Yorkers the option of enjoying a crisp-bottomed slice either as a full meal or a substantial snack between meals as they moved around the city. Pizza shop owners no longer needed to learn how to operate a coal-fired oven, meaning pizza could be made quicker and with less training. By the 1960s, the slice joint boom was on. And it is the slice joint that really turned pizza from an Italian Food in New York City into a New York City food — a meal shared across neighborhoods, ethnicities and age groups, equally at home in the Bay Ridge of “Saturday Night Fever” as in the Bedford-Stuyvesant of “Do the Right Thing.” 

This proliferation was also helped along by the same thing that brought pizza to this country in the first place: immigration. In the ’60s and ’70s, waves of immigrants from Eastern Europe, the Caribbean and Latin America began joining the work force and landing in food service roles, where the barrier to entry was much lower than in other fields.

As one of the standard-bearers of the current slice-joint renaissance, Scarr Pimentel remembers his spot on 138th Street and Broadway. “Kids like me pretty much grew up in pizza shops,” said Mr. Pimentel, whose family moved to New York from the Dominican Republic. “If you had five bucks you could have a slice, a soda and some ice cream. It was a full meal and sometimes the owner would slip us an extra slice or something.” Mr. Pimentel opened his own pizza shop in 2016, the sleek and retro Scarr’s Pizza on the Lower East Side. His slices and pies are made with organic flour, high-quality tomatoes and cheese and carefully sourced (often organic) toppings, but the slice-joint spirit holds true. “Who would’ve thought a kid like me from the Dominican Republic would own a pizza shop in New York City one day?” he added. 





JOE'S PIZZA

BLEECKER & CARMINE STREETS

GREENWICH VILLAGE, NY



John Kambouris immigrated to Washington Heights in 1965 from a small Greek island about 200 miles east of Athens. “I had $10 in my pocket,” he said from behind the counter of Pizza Palace on Dyckman Street, which he has owned since 1979, when he bought the business from an Italian couple he knew from the neighborhood. “They say the Italians bring the pizza here, but we put our culture on it.” In the 1960s this area was Irish and Jewish, he explained. Today, the neighborhood is home to a large Caribbean population, including a large concentration of immigrants from the Dominican Republic. “I love what I’m doing … we’re making pizza that people want and I don’t have to be Italian to make good pizza,” Mr. Kambouris said, before noting, “I’ve put three kids through college off of this shop.” 


It’s in hundreds of shops like his around the city, many no bigger than subway cars, where you’ll find New Yorkers shoulder to shoulder, eating slices in near silence. “Teens, Wall Street guys, guys camped out with a shopping cart, a pizza place is the most diverse space in the city,” said Colin Atrophy Hagendorf, author of “Slice Harvester: A Memoir in Pizza” and host of the Radio Harvester podcast. “Inside a pizzeria that dream of diverse New York City is a reality. I think that’s such a beautiful thing. 



Basta !






SUNDAY SAUCE

MACCHERONI

SPAGHETTI MEATBALLS

SOUP

And More ..